The Photos that didn’t make it into Book 2

Finally after what seems like a lifetime in “pre-production” my second book Can’t Sleep, Can’t Train, Can’t Stop : More Misadventures in Triathlon is up for pre-order at all the usual suspects. I’ve not seen a printed book yet, and possibly like last time, the public may get their copies from retailers before I manage to get hold of my own copy. I remember my mate Rich coming into my office with his copy for me to sign, and that was the first time I’d seen it in the ‘flesh’…so it’ll be interesting to see who gets theirs first: me or you?

I have however already got my hands on the digital files, the mobi ( amazon ) and the epub ( apple ) arrived earlier and I now have them uploaded on my devices and I have to say they look pretty cool.

Here's my book on my kindle

Here’s my book on my kindle

Interestingly my first book Can’t Swim, Can’t Ride, Can’t Run was 215 pages long, the sequel is 304 pages long excluding the photos. As part of the process I had to submit a load of photos for inclusion, in the editing and layout process these get whittled down, so some of them don’t make the book. So I thought it would be good to share with you the photos that didn’t quite make the final version and their captions. You may have seen some of them before. I hope you enjoy them.

Andy Holgate author of Can't Swim Can't Ride Can't Run with Viking

No it’s not the Mitchell brothers from Eastenders, Viking and I share a laugh at a book signing.

Chris Clarke ‘The Iron Hobbit’ blasts through ‘COLT Alley’ at Ironman UK. The Alley has become infamous and is one the noisiest locations on the whole course. If you race in Bolton prepare to feel the noise. (Coutesy of Thomas Phillips)

Chris Clarke ‘The Iron Hobbit’ blasts through ‘COLT Alley’ at Ironman UK. The Alley has become infamous and is one the noisiest locations on the whole course. If you race in Bolton prepare to feel the noise. (Coutesy of Thomas Phillips)

Limping badly after my slowest ever performance, my niece Eloise makes sure that Uncle Andrew finishes the Monster Middle Ely half marathon without getting in any more trouble. Seconds later I had to explain to the race referee why my bike had a rug attached to it in transition

Limping badly after my slowest ever performance, my niece Eloise makes sure that Uncle Andrew finishes the Monster Middle Ely half marathon without getting in any more trouble. Seconds later I had to explain to the race referee why my bike had a rug attached to it in transition

Extending the hand of friendship – The fun of triathlon is there for all to see as COLT and Pirate exchange greetings. Chris was just about to finish whilst I was just heading out on the run at the Fleetwood Sprint. We would be record PB’s that day.  ( Courtesy of www.martinholdenphotography.co.uk )

Extending the hand of friendship – The fun of triathlon is there for all to see as COLT and Pirate exchange greetings. Chris was just about to finish whilst I was just heading out on the run at the Fleetwood Sprint. We would both record PB’s that day. ( Courtesy of http://www.martinholdenphotography.co.uk )

The end is in sight – just about reaching the top of the monster climb up Kingsdale Head. I’d climbed from the valley floor behind me. The photo doesn’t do the view justice; it was breath taking both literally and metaphorically. I’m lucky to live in a beautiful part of the world.

The end is in sight – just about reaching the top of the monster climb up Kingsdale Head. I’d climbed from the valley floor behind me. The photo doesn’t do the view justice; it was breath taking both literally and metaphorically. I’m lucky to live in a beautiful part of the world.

Team Thurnham Cycles – the team that I’m an honorary member of. From left to right, David Holme, Andy Holme, Gareth Holme and Andrew Holme. All of them triathletes. In the front is the next generation of the team, Thomas and Joseph. (Courtesy of Andy Holme)

Team Thurnham Cycles – the team that I’m an honorary member of. From left to right, David Holme, Andy Holme, Gareth Holme and Andrew Holme. All of them triathletes. In the front is the next generation of the team, Thomas and Joseph. (Courtesy of Andy Holme)

“So how long have you worked on the Death Star?” – looking like a character from Star Wars with my black outfit, here I am being interviewed for the local television news. It was a great experience. (Courtesy of Lancaster University Press Office)

“So how long have you worked on the Death Star?” – looking like a character from Star Wars with my black outfit, here I am being interviewed for the local television news. It was a great experience. (Courtesy of Lancaster University Press Office)

Packing light – I lay out all the gear I need for racing in Lanzarote, the only thing missing is my bike. As you can see you really need a lot of stuff for Ironman racing, I usually take less with me for a two week family holiday.

Packing light – I lay out all the gear I need for racing in Lanzarote, the only thing missing is my bike. As you can see you really need a lot of stuff for Ironman racing, I usually take less with me for a two week family holiday.

The Kebab Leg – poor Chris Lawson picked up a cellulitis infection in the weeks before Lanzarote and with his leg swollen it was touch and go even the day before if he’d line up for the start. (Courtesy of Chris Lawson)

The Kebab Leg – poor Chris Lawson picked up a cellulitis infection in the weeks before Lanzarote and with his leg swollen it was touch and go even the day before if he’d line up for the start. (Courtesy of Chris Lawson)

Still moving forward – it was still light when I started the second lap of the marathon. I had about sixteen miles left to run, the light would soon leave me but there was no way that the darkness was going to take me.(Courtesy of Andy Ley)

Still moving forward – it was still light when I started the second lap of the marathon. I had about sixteen miles left to run, the light would soon leave me but there was no way that the darkness was going to take me.(Courtesy of Andy Ley)

“Marathons don’t bother me” – I still can’t believe I uttered that line but the excitement got the better of me. The smile is one of the biggest of my life as immediately after achieving my ‘impossible dream’ I’m interviewed by Mike Cliffe-Jones for Ironman.com. (Courtesy of www.trilanzarote.com)

“Marathons don’t bother me” – I still can’t believe I uttered that line but the excitement got the better of me. The smile is one of the biggest of my life as immediately after achieving my ‘impossible dream’ I’m interviewed by Mike Cliffe-Jones for Ironman.com. (Courtesy of http://www.trilanzarote.com)

Attacked with a cheese grater – my body got badly sunburnt despite the lashings of sun lotion. My forearms peeled badly in the days after the race, Emma dubbed it my ‘parmesan look’.

Attacked with a cheese grater – my body got badly sunburnt despite the lashings of sun lotion. My forearms peeled badly in the days after the race, Emma dubbed it my ‘parmesan look’.

Outlaw 2012 - I hate Triathlon

Outlaw 2012 – I hate Triathlon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 responses to “The Photos that didn’t make it into Book 2

  1. The mid-run Colt/Pirate handshake is the best! I’m surprised that didn’t make in. If these are the ones that didn’t make it, I can’t wait to see the ones that DID!

  2. I was hoping for more Lanzarote pics! Suppose I best buy the book now…

  3. Think there are 11 photos from the Lanzarote adventure in the book.

  4. So would you agree that Lanzarote is the toughest (or the hilliest) Ironman?

    • I think it’s a very subjective topic to be honest but from my point of view, it was the toughest race I’ve done.

      It doesn’t play to my strengths and highlights my weaknesses. I don’t like the heat and I don’t like hills. The run is a flat marathon yet the likes of Ironman Wales and Norseman ( which is in a class of it’s own above all other contenders ) have hilly runs. So people will argue for those races as being the toughest. Then you can also consider the new kids on the block : Celtman, Brutal, Horseman, City to Summit and that’s just in the UK. There are a few others around the world that also claim to be tough – but let’s face it any distance that involves propelling your body through 140.6 miles of exercise isn’t going to be easy, is it?

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